Oh no you don’t.

Thanks to everyone who left encouraging messages to my previous blogpost! It really did encourage me.

I actually did end up getting some writing done. 1500 words, in fact, which is not bad, given that I’m hand drafting again. 
Still… I kind of feel that I should share what’s on my mind. 
Truth is… I’m getting seriously frustrated with my publishing house. Because I handed in first edits in November. I got the news of my editor quitting in January. About a week later, I had a replacement editor. 
Who let me know the day before yesterday that my book has been put on the back burner and that he’ll look at it again in March. “LOOK AT IT.” In other words, I’ll probably see the bloody thing in April. If I’m lucky.
Which is a problem, given that the book was supposed to be out six months after I handed the book in in November. This is written into my contract. As is the fact that I’m supposed to receive a complete monthly accounting of my sales. Which I am yet to receive. 
I’ve been runaround and pretty much ignored ever since I decided to stay with this publishing house, and I’m tired of it. 
I guess my words were feeding my growing resentment instead. 
So today, I’ve decided to channel my anger and do something about the situation. I sent a warning that they’re toeing the line (or at least partially over the line) of breaching the contract I signed with them. For both books. 
Because yes, I might be small fry, but my work is important to me. And I refuse to have it languishing on some back burner due to something that actually has nothing to do with me or my work ethic. 
I’m. Just. Done.

EDIT: 

Since doing this post, the pub house came back to me and clarified some stuff. So for now, I’m satisfied. So even though it might upset people, I’m glad I came out and spoke about it. That’s why I sent them the mail. I can’t expect the pub house to be up front with me when I’m not being up front with them. 

Hopefully now that we understand each other, we’ll be able to come to a mutual beneficial situation for us both. 🙂

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20 thoughts on “Oh no you don’t.

  1. You did the right thing sending them that letter. It shows how serious you are and that you are honouring the contract and expect them to do the same. Stand firm and don't back down, Misha. Remember, the pen is mightier than the sword, and they won't like your actions if you are constantly given the runaround.

  2. Small fry. Ha!

    Like Alex says, “If it's in the contract….”

    I find that people will push you as far as you allow them to push. Maybe the same is true of pub houses…. after all, they are run by people.

  3. I'm sorry you're having this experience. That must be incredibly frustrating. But I think you did (and are doing) the right thing. Hope to hear soon that it's all worked out for you.

  4. Boy, i hear about these kinds of run-arounds more than sits well with me. Please keep us posted on how this all resolves. I appreciate you sharing with us what's going on– sounds like you're sticking up for yourself the way you should.

  5. There's a reason we hang with our bloggies, eh? (BLOGGING COMMUNITY, YOU TOTALLY RULE!) *ahem* So, uh, glad you're making progress too. Guess what? I'm finally ready for beta reading. Crazy, right? =) I seriously thought for a while there I'd be stuck on the last 50 pages of my draft for the next century. Guess I should have petitioned for encouragement too, eh? 😉

  6. Good for you. Stick to your guns and make them hold up their end of the contract.

    I know this is probably bad of me to say, but posts like this just reinforce my choice to self-publish. I'm not implying you made a mistake. Each writer has different goals and a unique situation and therefore has to choose his or her own path. If this is what you want, then hold them to their promises and go for it.

    For me, I know captaining my own ship is best.

  7. Problems crop up for publishers, such as editors quitting. The proper thing for the publisher to do would be to contact the affected authors and formally re-establish a schedule if the current one cannot be met due to circumstances, even if it means renegotiating or risk cancelling the contracts.

    Contracts are meant to protect both the publisher and the author. Not just one or the other. Things like this happen quite often with orphaned manuscripts. The way the publisher handles the situation, that is important–and revealing.

  8. Good on you, Misha. Don't let them push you around. Everything I hear gives the impression that publishers are banking on writers being falling-over-themselves grateful for having any kind of contract. They've forgotten that writers have other options these days, and that without writers, they have no business.

  9. You go girl! It is a good thing that you spoke up, because now they are aware that you know your rights in terms of your contract and that they cannot treat you poorly without getting a fight on their hands. I admire your spunk. You are fighting to give your babies (books) life and that is fantastic.

  10. Small fry or not: a contract is a contract, and that gives you power. You are in control of your books at this point, I think you should fight for it.

    Good for you! I'll be a waiting updates!

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